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Health

New Bariatric Procedures

What’s old is new!

You may have noticed that we’ve added two new procedures to our website, Lap-Band® and duodenal switch. Neither of these procedures are new operations, but we are now presenting them as options for patients for whom they may be a good fit. In this blog, we’ll give an overview of both procedures.

Lap-Band®

Bariatric Surgery for diabetes? Yes, bariatric surgery is far more than weight loss!

When most people think about bariatric surgery, weight loss is what comes to mind. However, the benefits of bariatric surgery extend much further than seeing lower numbers on the scale. Over the course of several future blog posts, we will discuss other reasons to have bariatric surgery.

Bariatric Surgery for Type 2 Diabetes

Main points:

Preparing for Bariatric Surgery

Considering weight loss surgery but don’t know where to start? Ian from the UT Health Tyler Bariatric Center gives an overview of the preparation process.

Bariatric surgery can help you regain your freedom and live a longer, healthier life. These procedures also can improve and in some cases resolve health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, sleep apnea, joint pain and more.

What is BMI and how is it used?

BMI is a term that gets used quite a bit in discussions about weight, obesity and bariatric surgery. The term has been the source of a lot of confusion.

BMI is short for “Body Mass Index.” It is simply a number calculated from a person’s height and weight. The more a person weighs in relation to their height, the higher their BMl. The formula used to calculate BMI is weight divided by height squared, and it is usually calculated in kg/meter2. Most times the units are not listed but assumed. For example when you say, “BMI of 35,” it is assumed that you mean “35 kg/meter2.”